WW1 Revisited

Archives

St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, is situated about 3 kilometres south of Rouen Cathedral and a short distance west of the road from Rouen to Elbeuf. Coming from Elbeuf/Caen on the N.138 follow Avenue Des Canadiens right down to the roundabout. Take the fourth exit into Boulevard Stanislas Girardin, and the cemetery lies 150 metres on the left. If coming from station Rive Gauche, Gare St Sever, follow Quai D’Elbeuf, Quai Jean Moulin,… Read More

Vendresse is a village in the Department of the Aisne 16 kilometres south of Laon. Vendresse British Cemetery is 800 metres north of the village on the west side of the road to Laon. The neighbourhood of Vendresse-Et-Troyon was the scene of repeated and severe fighting in which British troops took part in 1914 and 1918. Vendresse British Cemetery was made after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from other cemeteries… Read More

Vendresse Churchyard is located in the centre of this small village and to the north of the main road running through the village. The CWGC Plot, which is surrounded by a small hedge, can be found to the rear of the church within the confines of the churchyard. Vendresse village can be reached from the direction of Laon by following the D967, Laon to Fismes road. From this direction the road is… Read More

Etaples is a town about 27 kilometres south of Boulogne. Etaples Military Cemetery is to the north of the town, on the west side of the road to Boulogne. During the First World War, the area around Etaples was the scene of immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from attack, except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern or the southern battlefields. In 1917,… Read More

Miraumont is a village about 14.5 kilometres north-north-east of Albert and ADANAC Military Cemetery is some 3 kilometres south of the village on the east side of the road to Courcelette (D107). The cemetery is signposted in the centre of Miraumont. The villages of Miraumont and Pys were occupied on 24-25 February 1917 following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. They were retaken by the Germans on 25 March 1918, but… Read More

Thiepval is a village on the D151 road about 8 kilometres north of the town of Albert. Mill Road Cemetery (signposted at Thiepval) is about 1kilometre north-west of the village on the north side of the D73 road to Hamel. Access to the cemetery, 500 metres from the road, is by a track (suitable for cars). Before the 1916 Battle of the Somme, Thiepval was in German hands, garrisoned by the 160th… Read More

During the First World War, Le Treport was an important hospital centre. No 3 General Hospital was established there in November 1914, No 16 General Hospital in February 1915, No 2 Canadian General Hospital in March 1915, No 3 Convalescent Depot in June 1915 and Lady Murray’s BRCS Hospital in July 1916. These hospitals contained nearly 10,000 beds. No 47 General Hospital arrived in March 1917 and later that year, a divisional… Read More

Forceville is a village some 10 kilometres north-west of Albert on the road to Doullens. Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension lies to the west of the village of Forceville, 20 kilometres from Doullens and 10 kilometres from Albert, on the D938, the main road between these two places. Commonwealth forces took over this section of the front line from the French in 1915 and in early August, land to the south of… Read More

Louvencourt is a village 13 kilometres south-east of Doullens on the road to Albert (D938). Louvencourt Military Cemetery is on the south-eastern side of the village. From July 1915 to August 1916, field ambulances were established at Louvencourt, which was nearly 10 kilometres behind the front line on 1st July 1916. Following the 1916 Somme offensive, these medical units moved further east and the cemetery was little used until the German advances… Read More

Dernancourt is a village 3 kilometres south of Albert. The Communal Cemetery is a little west of the village, and the Extension is on the north-west side of the Communal Cemetery. Field ambulances used Dernancourt Communal Cemetery for Commonwealth burials from September 1915 to August 1916, and again during the German advance of March 1918. It contains 127 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. The XV Corps Main Dressing Station was… Read More

At the end of the Great War, there were thousands of British burial grounds scattered across the old battlefields that had once formed the Western Front. Some of these were a mere handful of graves, others like Lijssenthoek near Poperinghe – then the largest British cemetery – nearly 10,000 graves. The Imperial War Graves Commission (now Commonwealth War Graves Commission) had been formed in 1917 to take on the perpetual care of… Read More

Details Pozières is a village some 6 kilometres north-east of Albert, and the Cemetery, which is enclosed by the Pozières Memorial, is a little south-west of the village on the north side of the main road, D929, from Albert to Pozières. The village of Pozières was attacked on 23 July 1916 by the 1st Australian and 48th (South Midland) Divisions and was taken on the following day. It was lost on 24-25… Read More

Details Ovillers is a village about 5 kilometres north-east of the town of Albert off the D929 road to Bapaume. The Military Cemetery is approximately 500 metres west of the village on the D20 road to Aveluy. The Cemetery is signposted in the village. On 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the 8th Division attacked Ovillers and the 34th Division La Boisselle. The villages were not… Read More

Terlincthun British Cemetery is situated on the northern outskirts of Boulogne. From Calais follow the A16 to Boulogne, come off at Junction 3 and follow the D96E for Wimereux Sud. Continue on this road for approximately 1 kilometre when the Cemetery will be found on the left-hand side of the road. However, it should be noted that the entrance to the cemetery is in St Martin’s Road, which is the road on… Read More

I recently spent a week on the Somme Battlefields when it snowed heavily, and the landscape was transformed. Courcelette is a small village on the Somme, captured by the Canadian Corps during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on 15th September 1916. More than 8,500 Canadians died at Courcelette, and Courcelette British Cemetery is one of three in village. While there in January 2019, I was able to walk up to Courcelette British Cemetery… Read More